Will U.S. Students Continue To Study Abroad After Recent Terror Attacks?

While I was interning at Forbes, I wrote a story on whether U.S. students would continue to study abroad in light of the terrorist attacks in the summer of 2017. I also looked at how terrorist attacks in the past, too, affected current trends and whether studying abroad is, in fact, a worthy investment because of the attacks.

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Top 25 Public Colleges In The U.S. 2017

During my internship at Forbes, I wrote an article on the Top 25 Public Schools in the U,S. A few interesting trends from this year’s list: a total of 20 coastal schools populate this list, six of which are UC schools. Military schools also dominated this list.

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LET’S TALK, THEN FIGHT RACISM

Being Muslim in Trump’s America is frightening, but open discussions are necessary to end Islamophobia.

This was a post-election reflection opinion piece I wrote after business mogul Donald Trump was announced as winner of the 2016 presidential election. As a Muslim, a minority group that has been openly marginalized and alienated by the country’s president-elect,  I empathize with the fear of a Trump presidency. At the end of my article, I urge the public to come together as a community in times of fear. My article was the 29th most read article on the Daily Iowan by the end of Fall 2016. To read the full article: The Daily Iowan

Muslimin: Burqini ban undermines personal freedom

(Photo credits: The Daily Iowan)

This is an opinion piece I wrote after the French Government announced the burqini ban, which has since been overturned. The hijab has long been a hot-button issue in the Western world, with views varying from either end of the spectrum. I identify as a Muslim, and I wear the hijab, so the issue definitely resonated with me enough to write a commentary that was so close to my heart. For the full article at The Daily Iowan

Tattoos in the workplace raise eyebrows

While on my summer internship at the Quad City Times in Davenport, Iowa, I wrote a story about tattoos in the workplace. I had to conduct a mini “investigation” to find out if tattoos were in fact a “thing” at the workplaces around the Quad Cities. Career advisors suggested that although tattoos had been more common in the workplace, it was still not quite the norm yet.

Photo credit: Kevin E. Schmidt/The Quad City Times

For the full story, check it out at the Quad City Times

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Wapello teacher makes duck calls by hand

While on my internship at the Quad City Times, I was able to visit small town Wapello, Iowa to talk to a local teacher who hand makes duck calls. Brandon Brown is no ordinary school teacher. He works seven days a week at home inside his garage, where he works closely with his work equipment. My story got picked up by the Associated Press wire and was distributed nationwide. The Des Moines Register was one of the newspapers that shared my article.

photo credit: Beth Van Zandt/Muscatine Journal

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SOMETHING FELT, NOT PHOTOGRAPHED

In this article, I sat down with Malaysian author Nisah Haron to talk about her experiences as a writer. Haron, a former lawyer, left the world of legal affairs to pursue a full-time career in writing and storytelling in 2006. She was a member of the University of Iowa International Writing Program. She was just 17 when her literary career began with the publication of her first work, Di Sebalik Wajahmu, Aries [Aries’ Masquerade]. Her popular works include Cinta Sangkuriang Rindu Oedipus [Sangkuriang’s Love, Oedipus’ Longing], a collection of short stories published in 2006 that has been translated into English, and Lemang Nan Sebatang [The Lemang Soliloquy], which earned her the Ujana Malaysia Premier Literary Award. Here is the link for the full story: The Daily Iowan Link

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